Frequently Asked Questions

HOW DANGEROUS IS RADON?

"Radon is a gas that you cannot smell, taste or see. Radon forms naturally when uranium, radium and thorium break down in rocks, soil and groundwater. People can be exposed to radon primarily from breathing radon in air that comes through cracks and gaps in buildings and homes.

Breathing in radon can cause health problems. Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, responsible for over 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency." --Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020, January). Protect Yourself and Your Family From Radon. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://www.cdc.gov/radon/index.html

IF MY NEIGHBORS' TEST FOR RADON SHOWED THEY DIDN'T HAVE UNSAFE LEVELS, CAN I ASSUME THAT I DON'T HAVE A RADON PROBLEM?

"High radon levels can be a risk anywhere in any state. Both old and new homes can have radon problems as well as homes with or without basements. Two houses right next door to each other could have very different radon levels. " --Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, August). Radon Testing. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://ephtracking.cdc.gov/showRadonAndHealth

WILL IT BE HARDER TO SELL MY HOME IF RADON IS FOUND?

"Where radon problems have been fixed, home sales have not been blocked. The added protection will be a good selling point. " --U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2018, March). Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon. https://www.epa.gov/radon/home-buyers-and-sellers-guide-radon